Marmot Featherless Hoody Review

Marmot Featherless Hoody

MARMOT FEATHERLESS HOODY

Marmot have recently released the Marmot Featherless Hoody. A piece with all the warmth of 700 fill Power (FP) Down AND the resistance to moisture that a synthetic material provides. This is a bold claim but is it one that stands up?

Marmot Featherless Hoody
Marmot Featherless Hoody

The Jacket we received for testing is the Dark Spruce colour with the Cilantro zips which really pop out at you. After those colours the next thing that strikes you is the baffled design. The quilting gives this jacket a really stylish and contemporary look. The 3M Featherless insulation is blown into a Jacket in a similar way to down, which is one of the striking new changes  from the normal “sheets” that synthetic insulators come in. Like down you need this distinct stitching to keep the insulation in place.

Featherless Baffles.
Featherless Baffles.

The fit is not as athletic as some of marmots other technical jackets, but it feels the right choice with the featherless Hoody. This is a great jacket for using layers with and we had no problem with pulling it on over other clothing. That regular fit also leads us on to one of the major benefits of this jacket: its versatility. I found the featherless sits very much in the middle ground of use, it is an accomplished all-rounder.  You can comfortably use this on the uphill and not overheat, but it still feels warm enough to use it at the top when grabbing a snack. When not on the hill you will also find yourself throwing on this jacket whenever you leave the house. It is absolutely fine as an everyday jacket when the weather turns colder in autumn.

I have used this jacket around the Lake District throughout the autumn and winter and have been impressed with the warmth. My previous jacket, the RAB Nimbus, does not feel as warm as the Featherless so that extra fill power and the baffled stitching are making a difference. The Director of Adventure Peaks, Dave Pritt, has used this jacket as a key piece of his equipment on Island Peak and Aconcagua. This will be included on his kit for an expedition to Denali in June! He says” it is the packability and versatility in all temperatures that makes it one of my favourite pieces of gear”

So what about the other features? Two big, zippered, map compatible pockets and a smaller inside pocket too. The face fabric is a light, softer feeling, ripstop Nylon. This, coupled with the loose fill properties of the featherless insulation, means that the jacket packs down easily enough in to its own pocket.  The DWR finish makes it reliably shower proof, and the synthetic fill gives you the peace of mind to know that when the weather is damp, you are going to stay warm.

Packed Away.
Packed Away.

An all year round, functional and comfortable piece of kit to have. On its own it’s an excellent jacket that keeps you warm without having to watch the clouds for rain. But combine this with your base layer and a lighter top, like an Ether Driclime, and you are ready to face the elements with confidence. To answer the question we started this review with, it feels like a massive step in the right direction for synthetic jackets. It may struggle against some of the more technical down pieces out there but that is not what the Featherless Hoody is trying to achieve. It can comfortably hold its own against a range of other 700FP jackets. With its price point at £180, and its undoubted performance in the wet, it can be that jack of all trades jacket that doesn’t break the bank.